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J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2009 Dec;19(6):771-6. doi: 10.1089/cap.2008.0105.

Childhood onset diagnoses in a case series of teens at clinical high risk for psychosis.

Author information

  • 1Center of Prevention and Evaluation, New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA.

Abstract

REASONS: Schizophrenia is typically an adult neurodevelopmental disorder that has its antecedents in childhood and adolescence. Little is known about disorders "usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood and adolescence" (e.g., childhood-onset disorders) in "prodromal" teens at heightened clinical risk for psychotic disorder.

MAIN FINDINGS:

Childhood-onset disorders were prevalent in putatively prodromal teens, including anxiety and disruptive disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and, surprisingly, elimination disorders. These may reflect developmental antecedents in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.

KEY DATA AND STATISTICS:

A case series of 9 teens (ages 13-17) identified as prodromal to psychosis were evaluated with the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL). Childhood-onset diagnoses commonly endorsed (threshold or subthreshold) included ADHD (5/9), oppositional defiant disorder (5/9), enuresis or encopresis (4/9), conduct disorder (2/9), separation anxiety (3/9), and transient tic disorder (2/9). Enuresis was identified in 3 of the 4 older teens (ages 15-17).

MAJOR CONCLUSIONS:

An understanding of the childhood-onset disorders that occur in teens at risk for psychotic illnesses, such as schizophrenia, can shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and potentially inform early identification and intervention.

PMID:
20035596
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2830215
Free PMC Article
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