Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Glob Health Action. 2009 Jan 13;2. doi: 10.3402/gha.v2i0.1839.

Knowledge, attitudes and practice about malaria in rural Tigray, Ethiopia.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Medicine, UmeĆ„, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) regarding malaria and their determinants in a rural population of northern Ethiopia.

METHODS:

The study was conducted in the district of Samre Saharti, Tigray, northern Ethiopia. A structured questionnaire collecting socio-demographic and malaria-related KAP information was administered to the mothers from a representative sample of households.

RESULTS:

A total of 1652 questionnaires were available for analysis. Most of the respondents (92.7%) were able to mention at least one symptom of malaria. Mosquito as a cause of malaria was recognized by nearly half of the respondents (48.8%). Most of the households had a bed net (85.9%). To have a literate person at home, to belong to the lowland stratum, to have received some type of health education and to own a radio were associated with the knowledge of malaria. A strong association remained between living in the lowland stratum, to own a radio and to live close to the health post and the use of ITN. Being a housewife, lack of health education and to live further than 60 minutes walking distance to the health post were related to a delay on treatment finding.

CONCLUSION:

This study has identified some aspects which the MCP might need to improve. The knowledge about malaria transmission should be strengthened. Promotion of literacy and participation in health education are vital components in terms of malaria knowledge and practice. Issues related to geographical location and accessibility to health post should be also carefully examined.

KEYWORDS:

Ethiopia; Tigray; attitude; knowledge; malaria; practice

PMID:
20027277
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2779931
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk