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Science. 2009 Dec 18;326(5960):1680-3. doi: 10.1126/science.1173966.

Mozambican grass seed consumption during the Middle Stone Age.

Author information

  • Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada.

Abstract

The role of starchy plants in early hominin diets and when the culinary processing of starches began have been difficult to track archaeologically. Seed collecting is conventionally perceived to have been an irrelevant activity among the Pleistocene foragers of southern Africa, on the grounds of both technological difficulty in the processing of grains and the belief that roots, fruits, and nuts, not cereals, were the basis for subsistence for the past 100,000 years and further back in time. A large assemblage of starch granules has been retrieved from the surfaces of Middle Stone Age stone tools from Mozambique, showing that early Homo sapiens relied on grass seeds starting at least 105,000 years ago, including those of sorghum grasses.

PMID:
20019285
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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