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Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 Nov;43(11):1057-69. doi: 10.3109/00048670903107526.

Abnormalities in MRI signal intensity in schizophrenia associated with idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia.

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  • 1Department of Psychological Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, 89-1 Enyacho, Izumo, Japan. rei@med.shimane-u.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of the present study was to examine whether patients with idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome; GS) have specific changes in signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

METHODS:

Axial 5 mm-thick T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI was acquired from schizophrenia patients with GS (n = 24) and schizophrenia patients without GS (n = 60). All patients were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls without GS (n=60) and controls with GS (n=36). Signal intensity in the hippocampus, amygdala, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and cerebellum was measured in relation to the signal intensities of the vitreous body.

RESULTS:

Compared to both schizophrenia patients without GS and the control subjects without or with GS, the schizophrenia patients with GS had significantly decreased signal intensity in almost all the regions measured on T1-weighted MRI. On T2-weighted MRI, the schizophrenia patients with GS had significantly increased signal intensity in almost all the regions measured compared to both schizophrenia patients without GS and the control subjects without or with GS.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with schizophrenia-associated GS have specific changes in signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MRI, suggesting that schizophrenia with GS produces changes specifically in the frontotemporal cortex, limbic system, and basal ganglia.

PMID:
20001401
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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