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Am Psychol. 2009 Dec;64(9):863-90. doi: 10.1037/a0017497.

Abortion and mental health: Evaluating the evidence.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106-0001 USA. major@psych.ucsb.edu

Abstract

The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects and updates the report of the American Psychological Association Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion (2008). Major methodological problems pervaded most of the research reviewed. The most rigorous studies indicated that within the United States, the relative risk of mental health problems among adult women who have a single, legal, first-trimester abortion of an unwanted pregnancy is no greater than the risk among women who deliver an unwanted pregnancy. Evidence did not support the claim that observed associations between abortion and mental health problems are caused by abortion per se as opposed to other preexisting and co-occurring risk factors. Most adult women who terminate a pregnancy do not experience mental health problems. Some women do, however. It is important that women's varied experiences of abortion be recognized, validated, and understood.

2009 APA.

PMID:
19968372
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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