Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Acta Trop. 2010 Feb;113(2):95-104. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2009.11.012. Epub 2009 Dec 4.

Parasites and poverty: the case of schistosomiasis.

Author information

  • International Health, Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein 4126, Cleveland, OH 44106-7286, USA. chk@cwru.edu

Abstract

Simultaneous and sequential transmission of multiple parasites, and their resultant overlapping chronic infections, are facts of life in many underdeveloped rural areas. These represent significant but often poorly measured health and economic burdens for affected populations. For example, the chronic inflammatory process associated with long-term schistosomiasis contributes to anaemia and undernutrition, which, in turn, can lead to growth stunting, poor school performance, poor work productivity, and continued poverty. To date, most national and international programs aimed at parasite control have not considered the varied economic and ecological factors underlying multi-parasite transmission, but some are beginning to provide a coordinated approach to control. In addition, interest is emerging in new studies for the re-evaluation and recalibration of the health burden of helminthic parasite infection. Their results should highlight the strong potential of integrated parasite control in efforts for poverty reduction.

Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19962954
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2812649
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3a
Figure 3b
Figure 4
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk