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Nutr Res. 2009 Oct;29(10):716-22. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2009.10.001.

Both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-exposed, uninfected children living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico have similar rates of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E.

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  • 1University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Abstract

Our objective was to describe the prevalence of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Latin American children and a comparison group of HIV-exposed, uninfected children. Our hypothesis was that the rates of low concentrations of these micronutrients would be higher in the HIV-infected group than those in the HIV-exposed, uninfected group. This was a cross-sectional substudy of a larger cohort study at clinical pediatric HIV centers in Latin America. Serum levels of micronutrients were measured in the first stored sample obtained after each child's first birthday by high-performance liquid chromatography. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E were defined as serum levels below 0.70, 0.35, and 18.0 micromol/L, respectively. The population for this analysis was 336 children (124 HIV-infected, 212 HIV-exposed, uninfected) aged 1 year or older to younger than 4 years. Rates of low concentrations were 74% for retinol, 27% for beta-carotene, and 89% for vitamin E. These rates were not affected by HIV status. Among the HIV-infected children, those treated with antiretrovirals were less likely to have retinol deficiency, but no other HIV-related factors correlated with micronutrient low serum levels. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E are very common in children exposed to HIV living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico, regardless of HIV-infection status.

PMID:
19917451
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2782874
Free PMC Article
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