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Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2009 Dec;9(12):1463-75. doi: 10.1517/14712590903379494.

Therapeutic agents for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to tumour necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

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  • 1Institute for Cellular Medicine (Muscoskeletal Research Group), Newcastle University, 4th Floor, Catherine Cookson Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. j.d.isaacs@ncl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disabling autoimmune disease; unless adequately controlled, patients have a poor long-term prognosis. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antagonists have provided relief for many RA patients; however, despite their efficacy, some patients do not respond or fail to maintain initial response. In the UK, patients with an inadequate response to TNF-alpha antagonists have limited options, as the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) currently only recommend switching to an alternative TNF-alpha antagonists if discontinuation occurs due to safety during the first 6 months of treatment. The EU has approved three biological agents, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab, for patients with RA with an inadequate response to TNF-alpha antagonists.

OBJECTIVE:

This review examines the clinical experience with two therapies targeting key immune cells involved in RA -- rituximab (lyses B-cells), and abatacept (T-cell co-stimulation modulator) -- specifically focusing on patients with an inadequate response to TNF-alpha blockade.

METHODS:

Phase II/III clinical trials and original studies were identified using Medline and Pubmed; articles assessing the efficacy and/or safety of rituximab or abatacept in patients with RA refractory to TNF-alpha blockade were reviewed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinical data for rituximab and abatacept demonstrate that both reduce disease activity in TNF-alpha antagonist inadequate responders, suggesting that agents with alternative mechanisms of action, such as those targeting key immune cells, may be useful in this patient population.

PMID:
19916731
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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