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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Jul;18(7):1417-22. doi: 10.1038/oby.2009.416. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Genetic effects on postprandial variations of inflammatory markers in healthy individuals.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ycheng@medicine.umaryland.edu

Abstract

Circulating levels of inflammatory markers predict the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mediated perhaps in part by dietary fat intake, through mechanisms only partially understood. To evaluate post-fat load changes in inflammatory markers and genetic influences on these changes, we administered a standardized high-fat meal to 838 related Amish subjects as part of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study and measured a panel of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -9 (MMP-1 and MMP-9), and white blood cell (WBC) count, before and 4 h after fat challenge (CRP prechallenge only). Heritabilities (h(2) +/- s.d.) of basal inflammatory levels ranged from 16 +/- 8% for MMP-9 (P = 0.02) to 90 +/- 7% for MMP-1 (P < 0.0001). Post-fat load, circulating levels of WBC, MMP-1, and MMP-9 increased by 16, 32, and 43% (all P < 0.0001), with no significant changes in IL-1beta. Postprandial changes over the 4-h period were modestly heritable for WBC (age- and sex-adjusted h(2) = 14 +/- 9%, P = 0.04), but the larger MMP-1 and MMP-9 changes appeared to be independent of additive genetic effects. These results reveal that a high-fat meal induces a considerable inflammatory response. Genetic factors appear to play a significant role influencing basal inflammatory levels but to have minimal influence on post-fat intake inflammatory changes.

PMID:
19910936
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3066005
Free PMC Article
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