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J Pediatr. 2010 Feb;156(2):277-84.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.08.008. Epub 2009 Nov 5.

Professional identification of psychosocial problems among children from ethnic minority groups: room for improvement.

Author information

  • 1Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands. m.r.crone@lumc.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effectiveness of child health care professionals (CHP) in identifying psychosocial problems among children originating from industrialized and nonindustrialized countries and to assess whether parental concerns enhance CHP problem-identification.

STUDY DESIGN:

During routine well-child visits data were collected from a sample of children aged 5 to 12 years of Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, Surinam, and Antillean origin (response: 82%). CHP reported on psychosocial problems that they identified in children. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and a questionnaire on concerns regarding their child's psychosocial development. Interpreter services were used to support parents in filling out questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Elevated CBCL total and internalizing problem scores were more prevalent among children from nonindustrialized countries (10% and 17%, respectively) than among children from industrialized countries (3% and 5%, respectively). About 30% of the Turkish and Moroccan children with an elevated CBCL score were identified by CHPs compared with 60% of the children from industrialized countries. Parental concerns on their child's psychosocial well-being were related to elevated CBCL scores. Concerns were not related to CHP problem-identification.

CONCLUSIONS:

Better methods to support parents in disclosure of their concerns regarding the psychosocial development of their children may enhance CHP-identification of problems, especially among groups from nonindustrialized countries.

Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19892367
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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