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Urology. 2010 Mar;75(3):581-4. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2009.04.064. Epub 2009 Oct 30.

Detection of subclinical CO2 embolism by transesophageal echocardiography during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To document incidences of subclinical embolism in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with continuous monitoring using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE).

METHODS:

A total of 43 patients scheduled for elective robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy under general anesthesia were enrolled in this study. A 4-chamber view of 5.0-MHz multiplane TEE was continuously monitored to detect any intracardiac bubbles as an embolism. An independent TEE specialist reviewed the tapes for interpretation, and emboli were classified as 1 of 5 stages. Cardiorespiratory instability during gas emboli entry was defined as an appearance of cardiac arrhythmias, sudden decrease in mean arterial blood pressure >20 mm Hg, or an episode of pulse oximetric saturation <90%.

RESULTS:

Gas embolisms were observed in 7 of 41 (17.1%) patients during transection of the deep dorsal venous complex. Of them, 1, 3, 1, and 2 showed stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. However, there were no signs of cardiorespiratory instability associated with emboli. The 95% confidence interval for gas embolism was 0.204%-0.138%. No correlation was observed between episodes of gas embolism and blood gas variables or end-tidal CO(2) partial pressure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Subclinical gas embolisms occur in 17.1% of laparoscopic radical prostatectomies. We should consider that this procedure has a potential for serious gas embolism, especially with the increasing popularity of laparoscopic prostatectomy using robot-assisted techniques.

2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
19879638
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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