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Echocardiography. 2009 Oct;26(9):1006-11. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-8175.2009.00921.x.

Left ventricular end-systolic stress in young adults: distribution, risk factors, and relation to cardiovascular disease events.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined the relationship of left ventricular (LV) end-systolic meridional wall stress (LVESS), a measure of LV afterload, with race, gender, other cardiovascular risk factors and LV mass in 3,994 young adults in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

METHODS:

From transthoracic echocardiography, LVESS was derived from LV internal dimension and posterior wall thickness and systolic blood pressure (BP).

RESULTS:

Adjusted LVESS was significantly greater in black men versus women (59.0 vs. 54.8 dynes/cm, P < 0.01) and in white men versus women (59.0 vs. 55.4 dynes/cm(2), P < 0.01), but did not differ in comparing whites versus blacks either in men or women. In multiple regression analyses, age and LV mass were inversely (P < 0.01) and height was positively (P < 0.01) associated with LVESS. The overall variance of LVESS explained by the models in each race-sex subgroup was low (R(2) less than 0.03), suggesting that standard risk factors contribute little to determining LVESS in young adults. Over a 15-year follow-up period, LVESS, after the adjustment for covarieties, was not associated with the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events.

CONCLUSION:

LVESS may not be a useful marker of cardiovascular risk in young adults; further study is needed to determine whether other echocardiographic measures may be more useful predictors.

PMID:
19840068
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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