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J Aging Health. 2009 Dec;21(8):1063-82. doi: 10.1177/0898264309344682. Epub 2009 Oct 15.

The role of coping resources on change in well-being during persistent health decline.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, VU Medical Centre, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ag.jonker@vumc.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Research in older persons with deteriorating health shows a decrease in well-being. The aim of this study was to examine the role of psychological coping resources in the association between health decline and well-being, in a longitudinal design.

METHOD:

Data were used from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA). Health decline was defined as persistent deterioration of functioning (PDF), persistent decline in cognitive functioning and/or physical functioning, and/or increase of chronic diseases. Measurements of well-being included life satisfaction and positive affect. Measurements of coping resources included self-esteem, mastery, and self-efficacy.

RESULTS:

Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that self-efficacy, mastery, and self-esteem mediated the association between PDF and change in well-being. Mastery also was a moderator of the association between PDF and life satisfaction. In older persons with a decreasing mastery, PDF was associated with a significant decrease on life satisfaction; this effect was not observed in older persons with stable or increasing mastery.

DISCUSSION:

This study suggests that coping resources are of importance in explaining associations between persistent health decline and decreasing well-being. Stable or improving mastery even proves to protect older persons with PDF from decreasing well-being.Therefore, it may be of importance to develop interventions for older persons aimed at maintaining or improving psychological coping resources when health declines.

PMID:
19833864
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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