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J Perinatol. 2010 Apr;30(4):275-80. doi: 10.1038/jp.2009.155. Epub 2009 Oct 8.

Inhaled nitric oxide in premature infants: effect on tracheal aspirate and plasma nitric oxide metabolites.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. michael.posencheg@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is a potential new therapy for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and brain injury in premature infants. This study examined dose-related effects of iNO on NO metabolites as evidence of NO delivery.

STUDY DESIGN:

A subset of 102 premature infants in the NO CLD trial, receiving 24 days of iNO (20 p.p.m. decreasing to 2 p.p.m.) or placebo, were analyzed. Tracheal aspirate (TA) and plasma samples collected at enrollment and at intervals during study gas were analyzed for NO metabolites.

RESULT:

iNO treatment increased NO metabolites in TA at 20 and 10 p.p.m. (1.7- to 2.3-fold vs control) and in plasma at 20, 10, and 5 p.p.m. (1.6- to 2.3-fold). In post hoc analysis, treated infants with lower metabolite levels at entry had an improved clinical outcome.

CONCLUSION:

iNO causes dose-related increases in NO metabolites in the circulation as well as lung fluid, as evidenced by TA analysis, showing NO delivery to these compartments.

PMID:
19812581
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2834364
Free PMC Article

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