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J Cell Sci. 2009 Oct 15;122(Pt 20):3810-21. doi: 10.1242/jcs.050344.

Myosin-Va-interacting protein, RILPL2, controls cell shape and neuronal morphogenesis via Rac signaling.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Brain Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. marief.lise@gmail.com

Abstract

Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in neuronal function. The establishment and maintenance of neuronal morphology is intimately linked to the actin cytoskeleton; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate changes in neuronal morphology are poorly understood. Here we identify a novel myosin-Va (MyoVa)-interacting protein, RILPL2, which regulates cellular morphology. Overexpression of this protein in young or mature hippocampal neurons results in an increase in the number of spine-like protrusions. By contrast, knockdown of endogenous RILPL2 in neurons by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference results in reduced spine-like protrusions, a phenotype rescued by overexpression of an shRNA-insensitive RILPL2 mutant, suggesting a role for RILPL2 in both the establishment and maintenance of dendritic spines. Interestingly, we demonstrate that RILPL2 and the Rho GTPase Rac1 form a complex, and that RILPL2 is able to induce activation of Rac1 and its target, p21-activated kinase (Pak). Notably, both RILPL2-mediated morphological changes and activation of Rac1-Pak signaling were blocked by expression of a truncated tail form of MyoVa or MyoVa shRNA, demonstrating that MyoVa is crucial for proper RILPL2 function. This might represent a novel mechanism linking RILPL2, the motor protein MyoVa and Rac1 with neuronal structure and function.

PMID:
19812310
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2758809
Free PMC Article
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