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Qual Life Res. 2009 Dec;18(10):1301-9. doi: 10.1007/s11136-009-9543-6. Epub 2009 Oct 6.

Age trajectories of quality of life among older adults: results from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK. p.zaninotto@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore age-trajectories of quality of life (QoL) and influences on them in a 4-year period among older adults living in England.

METHODS:

Data come from three waves (2002-2003 and 2006-2007) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a large panel study of 11,392 individuals aged 50 and over. We used Latent Growth Curve models and ageing-vector graphs to describe both individual differences and average population age-trajectories in QoL (measured by the CASP19 questionnaire).

RESULTS:

QoL at baseline was poorer for older than younger respondents, with the differences widening with age. QoL also declined more rapidly for older individuals. Gender, education, depression, limiting long-standing illness, difficulty with ADL-s, lack of wealth, non-employment, decreased number of friends and low positive support had a negative impact on QoL. Living with a partner had a positive effect on the QoL of men but not of women. The ageing-vector graphs revealed a clear gradient in age-trajectories of QoL for those in the best to the worst psychosocial, socioeconomic and health conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Younger old adults can be prepared for further ageing by increasing their network of friends and engaging with the wider community while they are able.

PMID:
19806468
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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