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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Oct;163(10):922-30. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.176.

A longitudinal study of maternal depression and child maltreatment in a national sample of families investigated by child protective services.

Author information

  • 1Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kconron@post.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether a change in depression predicts a mother's change in maltreatment.

DESIGN:

Observational, repeated measures study.

SETTING:

National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being, 1999 to 2004.

PARTICIPANTS:

Mothers who retained custody of a child aged 0 to 15 years following a maltreatment investigation and completed at least 2 of 3 surveys (n = 2386).

MAIN EXPOSURE:

Change in depression status between baseline and 18- and 36-month follow-ups, assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Change in psychological aggression, physical assault, and neglect between baseline and 18- and 36-month follow-ups, assessed with the Conflict Tactics Scale Parent-Child version.

RESULTS:

One-third (35.5%) of mothers experienced onset or remission of depression. Onset of depression was associated with an increase of 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.2-4.4) psychologically aggressive acts in an average 12-month period, but was not statistically significantly associated with change in physical assault or neglect.

CONCLUSION:

Depression is positively associated with maternal perpetration of psychological aggression in high-risk families.

PMID:
19805711
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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