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Surg Endosc. 2010 Apr;24(4):924-32. doi: 10.1007/s00464-009-0700-3. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

Long-term outcome of laparoscopic Nissen and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a prospective, randomized trial.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, J45 OMB, Health Sciences Faculty, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925, Cape Town, South Africa. John.Shaw@uct.ac.za

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A prospective, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the long-term outcome and patient satisfaction of laparoscopic complete 360 degrees fundoplication compared with partial posterior 270 degrees fundoplication. Partial fundoplication is purported to have fewer side effects with a higher failure rate in controlling gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), while complete fundoplication is thought to result in more dysphagia and gas-related symptoms.

METHODS:

Patients were randomized to either laparoscopic Nissen (LN) or laparoscopic Toupet (LT) fundoplication. Esophageal manometry, 24-h pH studies, a detailed questionnaire, and a visual analog symptom (VAS) score were completed before and after surgery. A final global outcome questionnaire was performed. Failure was defined as recurrent GERD requiring revision surgery, maintenance proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, or surgery for postoperative dysphagia.

RESULTS:

One hundred patients were randomized to LN (50) or LT (50). There were no differences between LN and LT with respect to postoperative symptoms and physiological variables except a higher wrap pressure in the LN group (15.2 vs. 12.0 mmHg). Dysmotility improved in 8/14 (57%) and 6/11 (54%) patients in the LN group and the LT group, respectively, after surgery. There was no correlation between dysmotility and dysphagia both pre- and post surgery in the two groups. Recurrent symptoms of GERD occurred in 8/47 (17.0%) and 8/48 (16.6%) in the LN group and the LT group, respectively. Outcome of patients with dysmotility was similar to those with normal motility in both groups. At final follow-up (59.76 + or - 24.23 months), in the LN group, 33/37 (89.1%) would recommend surgery to others, 32/37 (86.4%) would have repeat surgery, and 34/37 (91.8%) felt they were better off than before surgery. The corresponding numbers for the LT group (follow-up = 55.18 + or - 25.97 months) were 35/36 (97.2%), 30/36 (83.3%), and 33/36 (91.6%).

CONCLUSION:

LN and LT are equally effective in restoring the lower esophageal sphincter function and provide similar long-term control of GERD with no difference in dysphagia. Esophageal dysmotility had no influence on the outcome of either operation.

PMID:
19789920
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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