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PLoS One. 2009 Sep 28;4(9):e7180. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007180.

Neuroanatomical variability of religiosity.

Author information

  • 1Clinical Research Branch, National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

Abstract

We hypothesized that religiosity, a set of traits variably expressed in the population, is modulated by neuroanatomical variability. We tested this idea by determining whether aspects of religiosity were predicted by variability in regional cortical volume. We performed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 40 healthy adult participants who reported different degrees and patterns of religiosity on a survey. We identified four Principal Components of religiosity by Factor Analysis of the survey items and associated them with regional cortical volumes measured by voxel-based morphometry. Experiencing an intimate relationship with God and engaging in religious behavior was associated with increased volume of R middle temporal cortex, BA 21. Experiencing fear of God was associated with decreased volume of L precuneus and L orbitofrontal cortex BA 11. A cluster of traits related with pragmatism and doubting God's existence was associated with increased volume of the R precuneus. Variability in religiosity of upbringing was not associated with variability in cortical volume of any region. Therefore, key aspects of religiosity are associated with cortical volume differences. This conclusion complements our prior functional neuroimaging findings in elucidating the proximate causes of religion in the brain.

PMID:
19784372
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2746321
Free PMC Article

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