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Matern Child Health J. 2010 Nov;14(6):922-30. doi: 10.1007/s10995-009-0519-5.

Pediatric vaccination and vaccine-preventable disease acquisition: associations with care by complementary and alternative medicine providers.

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  • 1Harborview Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359765, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. ldowney@u.washington.edu

Abstract

This study investigated provider-based complementary/alternative medicine use and its association with receipt of recommended vaccinations by children aged 1-2 years and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease by children aged 1-17 years. Results were based on logistic regression analysis of insurance claims for pediatric enrollees covered by two insurance companies in Washington State during 2000-2003. Primary exposures were use of chiropractic, naturopathy, acupuncture, or massage practitioner services by pediatric enrollees or members of their immediate families. Outcomes included receipt by children aged 1-2 years of four vaccine combinations (or their component vaccines) covering seven diseases, and acquisition of vaccine-preventable diseases by enrollees aged 1-17 years. Children were significantly less likely to receive each of the four recommended vaccinations if they saw a naturopathic physician. Children who saw chiropractors were significantly less likely to receive each of three of the recommended vaccinations. Children aged 1-17 years were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a vaccine-preventable disease if they received naturopathic care. Use of provider-based complementary/alternative medicine by other family members was not independently associated with early childhood vaccination status or disease acquisition. Pediatric use of complementary/alternative medicine in Washington State was significantly associated with reduced adherence to recommended pediatric vaccination schedules and with acquisition of vaccine-preventable disease. Interventions enlisting the participation of complementary/alternative medicine providers in immunization awareness and promotional activities could improve adherence rates and assist in efforts to improve public health.

PMID:
19760163
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2924961
Free PMC Article
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