Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Urol. 2009 Nov;182(5):2242-8. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2009.07.034. Epub 2009 Sep 16.

Men older than 70 years have higher risk prostate cancer and poorer survival in the early and late prostate specific antigen eras.

Author information

  • 1Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Prostate Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We clarified whether men older than 70 years have a higher risk of prostate cancer and poorer survival in the early and late prostate specific antigen eras.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A cohort of 4,561 men who underwent radical prostatectomy were stratified into 3 age groups (younger than 60, 60 to 70 and older than 70 years), and early and late prostate specific antigen eras based on the year of surgery (before 2000 and 2000 or later). Race, body mass index, prostate specific antigen, prostate weight, tumor volume, pathological Gleason sum, pathological tumor stage, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion and surgical margin status were submitted for univariate and multivariable analyses against the previously mentioned groups. Survivals (prostate specific antigen recurrence, distant metastasis and disease specific death) were compared among the 3 age groups using univariate and multivariable methods.

RESULTS:

Compared with younger age groups (younger than 60, 60 to 70 years) men older than 70 years had a higher proportion of pathological tumor stage 3/4 (33.0 vs 44.3 vs 52.1%, p <0.001), pathological Gleason sum greater than 7 (9.5% vs 13.4% vs 17.2%, p <0.001) and larger tumor volume (3.7 vs 4.7 vs 5.2 cc, p <0.001). Pathological Gleason sum in men older than 70 years did not differ between the early and late prostate specific antigen eras (p = 0.071). Men older than 70 years had a higher risk of prostate specific antigen recurrence, distant metastasis and disease specific death on univariate (p <0.05) but not multivariable analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Men older than 70 years had higher risk disease and poorer survival in the early and late prostate specific antigen eras. Pathological Gleason sums did not change between the 2 eras. Patient age was an important variable in prostate specific antigen screening, biopsy, treatment and prognosis.

Comment in

  • Editorial comment. [J Urol. 2009]
PMID:
19758616
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk