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Contemp Clin Trials. 2010 Jan;31(1):71-81. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2009.09.002. Epub 2009 Sep 13.

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD): design and methods.

Author information

  • 1Department of Health & Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, PO Box 7868, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA. katulaj@wfu.edu

Abstract

Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) developed a lifestyle weight loss intervention that has been demonstrated to prevent type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals, it has yet to be widely adopted at the community level. The Healthy Living Partnership to Prevent Diabetes study (HELP PD) was designed to translate the DPP approach for use in community settings as a cost-effective intervention led by Community Health Workers (CHW's) and administered through a Diabetes Care Center (DCC). Approximately 300 overweight and obese (BMI 25-40 kg/m(2)) individuals with prediabetes (fasting blood glucose 95-124 mg/dl) were randomly assigned to either a lifestyle weight loss intervention (LW) or an enhanced usual care comparison condition (UC). The goal of LW is >or=7% weight loss achieved through increases in physical activity (180 min/wk) and decreases in caloric intake (approximately 1500 kcal/day). The intervention consists of CHW-led group-mediated cognitive behavioral meetings that occur weekly for 6 months and monthly thereafter for 18 months. UC consists of 2 individual meetings with a registered dietitian and a monthly newsletter. The primary outcome is change in fasting blood glucose. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular risk factors, health-related quality of life, and social cognitive variables. Outcomes are masked and are collected every 6 months. The cost-effectiveness of the program will also be assessed. A community-based program that is administered through local DCC's and that harnesses the experience of community members (CHW's) may be a promising strategy for the widespread dissemination of interventions effective at preventing type 2 diabetes in high risk individuals.

Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19758580
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2818212
Free PMC Article
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