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Indian J Orthop. 2008 Jul;42(3):287-93. doi: 10.4103/0019-5413.39554.

Extensively coated revision stems in proximally deficient femur: early results in 15 patients.

Author information

  • 1Max Institute of Orthopedics and Joint Replacement, Max Super Specialty Hospitals, 1, Press Enclave Road, Saket, New Delhi - 110 017, India. sanjivdr@del3.vsnl.net.in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hip replacement following failed internal fixation (dynamic hip screw for intertrochanteric fractures) or previous hip arthroplasty presents a major surgical challenge. Proximal fitting revision stems do not achieve adequate fixation. Distal fixation with long-stemmed extensively coated cementless implants (like the Solution system) affords a suitable solution. We present our early results of 15 patients treated with extensively coated cementless revision stems.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fifteen patients with severely compromised proximal femora following either failed hip arthroplasty or failed internal fixation (dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric fractures) were operated by the senior author over a two-year period. Eight patients had aseptic loosening of their femoral stems following cemented hip replacements, with severe thinning of their proximal cortices and impending stress fractures. Seven had secondary hip arthritis following failure of long implants for comminuted intertrochanteric or subtrochanteric femoral fractures. All patients were treated by removal of implant (cemented stems/DHS implants) and insertion of long-stemmed extensively coated cementless revision ('Solution DePuy, Warsaw (IN), US') stems along with press-fit acetabular component (Duraloc Cup, DePuy, Warsaw (IN), US). All eight hip revisions needed extended trochanteric osteotomies.

RESULTS:

All patients were primarily kept in bed on physiotherapy for six weeks and then gradually progressed to weight-bearing walking over the next six to eight weeks. The Harris Hip Scores and patient satisfaction were used for final evaluation. We achieved good results in the short term studied. In our first three patients (all following failed cemented total hip replacements), we resorted to cerclage wiring to hold osteotomised segments (done to facilitate stem removal). The subsequent 12 proceeded without the need for cerclage wiring. One patient had a intraoperative severe comminuted fracture extending into the supracondylar region while hammering in the stem. Post cerclage wiring, she was put on a long knee brace and her mobilization was delayed to 12 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS:

The extensively coated cementless ('Solution') femoral stem provides a reasonable 'solution' to the deficient femur in hip revision. The proximal femoral deficiences can be relatively easily bypassed and distal fixation can be achieved with this stem. Extreme care needs to be taken to avoid fractures and penetration of the femoral shaft, which can, however, be managed by cerclage wiring. Principles of a successful outcome include preservation of the functional continuity of the abduction apparatus, care to recognize and prevent distal extension of fracture while inserting the stem (preemptive cerclage wiring) and supervised rehabilitation.

KEYWORDS:

Cementless fixation; extensively coated; proximally deficient femur

PMID:
19753154
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2739478
Free PMC Article

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