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Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2009;4:301-13. Epub 2009 Sep 1.

Pilot study of a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention post-rehabilitation for COPD.

Author information

  • 1University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98199, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a six-month, cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following pulmonary rehabilitation.

METHODS:

Participants who completed a two-week run-in were randomly assigned to either MOBILE-Coached (n = 9) or MOBILE-Self-Monitored (n = 8). All participants met with a nurse to develop an individualized exercise plan, were issued a pedometer and exercise booklet, and instructed to continue to log their daily exercise and symptoms. MOBILE-Coached also received weekly reinforcement text messages on their cell phones; reports of worsening symptoms were automatically flagged for follow-up. Usability and satisfaction were assessed. Participants completed incremental cycle and six minute walk (6MW) tests, wore an activity monitor for 14 days, and reported their health-related quality of life (HRQL) at baseline, three, and six months.

RESULTS:

The sample had a mean age of 68 +/-11 and forced expiratory volume in one second 18% predicted. Participants reported that logging their exercise and symptoms (FEV(1)) of 40 +/- was easy and that keeping track of their exercise helped them remain active. There were no differences between groups over time in maximal workload, 6MW distance, or HRQL (p > 0.05); however, MOBILE-Self-Monitored increased total steps/day whereas MOBILE-Coached logged fewer steps over six months (p =0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

We showed that it is feasible to deliver a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention to patients with COPD post-rehabilitation and that the addition of coaching appeared to be no better than self-monitoring. The latter finding needs to be interpreted with caution since this was a purely exploratory study.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00373932).

KEYWORDS:

cell phones; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; exercise persistence; physical activity; pulmonary rehabilitation

PMID:
19750190
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2740952
Free PMC Article
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