Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2009 Sep;70(5):660-7.

Subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol during early drinking experiences predict alcohol involvement in treated adolescents.

Author information

  • 1Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic/Pittsburgh Adolescent Alcohol Research Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. chungta@upmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Research on low subjective response to alcohol has focused primarily on alcohol's sedative effects during early drinking experiences. This study examined subjective response to both stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol during initial drinking experiences as predictors of treated adolescents' severity of alcohol involvement before treatment and over 1-year follow-up.

METHOD:

Adolescents (N = 169) recruited from addictions treatment reported on the number of drinks needed to obtain stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol for early and heavy drinking periods. The number of drinks needed to obtain stimulant and sedative effects, as well as the degree of stimulant and sedative effect obtained, were examined as predictors of adolescents' alcohol involvement at baseline (before treatment) and 1-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

During early drinking experiences, females reported a greater degree of sedative effect compared with males; there was no gender difference in degree of stimulant effect reported during early drinking experiences. Both early subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol predicted the usual number of drinks needed to become intoxicated and the maximum drinking quantity per day before treatment. However, at 1-year follow-up, only early sedative effects predicted 1-year outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Study findings suggest potentially important roles for both early subjective stimulant and sedative effects of alcohol in relation to adolescent alcohol involvement.

PMID:
19737489
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2741546
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Dartmouth Journal Services Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk