Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biol Chem. 2009 Oct 23;284(43):29714-24. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M109.038737. Epub 2009 Sep 3.

Glu-333 of nicastrin directly participates in gamma-secretase activity.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.

Abstract

gamma-Secretase is a proteolytic membrane complex that processes a variety of substrates including the amyloid precursor protein and the Notch receptor. Earlier we showed that one of the components of this complex, nicastrin (NCT), functions as a receptor for gamma-secretase substrates. A recent report challenged this, arguing instead that the Glu-333 residue of NCT predicted to participate in substrate recognition only participates in gamma-secretase complex maturation and not in activity per se. Here, we present evidence that Glu-333 directly participates in gamma-secretase activity. By normalizing to the active pool of gamma-secretase with two separate methods, we establish that gamma-secretase complexes containing NCT-E333A are indeed deficient in intrinsic activity. We also demonstrate that the NCT-E333A mutant is deficient in its binding to substrates. Moreover, we find that the cleavage of substrates by gamma-secretase activity requires a free N-terminal amine but no minimal length of the extracellular N-terminal stub. Taken together, these studies provide further evidence supporting the role of NCT in substrate recognition. Finally, because gamma-secretase cleaves itself during its maturation and because NCT-E333A also shows defects in gamma-secretase complex maturation, we present a model whereby Glu-333 can serve a dual role via similar mechanisms in the recruitment of both Type 1 membrane proteins for activity and the presenilin intracellular loop during complex maturation.

PMID:
19729449
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2785603
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk