Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Sep;114(3):568-72. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181b19154.

Increasing incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Sweden.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. therese.m-l.andersson@ki.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer during different calendar periods and when pregnancy-associated breast cancer was diagnosed in relation to delivery.

METHODS:

This was a population-based cohort study using data from Swedish registers between 1963 and 2002, encompassing women aged 15-44 years at the date of breast cancer diagnosis. Outcome measures included incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer per 100,000 deliveries, the proportion of pregnancy-associated breast cancer among all breast cancers, and observed-to-expected rates.

RESULTS:

Between 1963 and 2002, 1,161 cases of pregnancy-associated breast cancer among a total of 16,620 breast cancers were identified in women aged 15 to 44 years. The incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer increased from 16.0 to 37.4 per 100,000 deliveries comparing the first and last calendar periods under study. During pregnancy, the overall incidence was 2.4 per 100,000 deliveries; the incidence during the first and second year after delivery was 10.6 and 15.0 per 100,000 deliveries, respectively. Fewer pregnancy-associated breast cancers than expected were diagnosed during pregnancy and the first 6 months after delivery. Thereafter, there was no difference between observed compared with expected number of breast cancers.

CONCLUSION:

The incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer increased during the study period, partly caused by a trend of postponement of childbearing to an older age. The present findings suggest that breast cancer is underdiagnosed during pregnancy and lactation.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

III.

PMID:
19701036
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk