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Environ Res. 2009 Oct;109(7):891-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2009.07.014. Epub 2009 Aug 22.

Residential proximity to agricultural pesticide applications and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Author information

  • 1Northern California Cancer Center, 2001 Center Street, Suite 700, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA. rrull@nccc.org

Abstract

Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5m) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child's lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, chlorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia.

PMID:
19700145
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2748130
Free PMC Article
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