Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9A):1621-8. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009990462.

The Mediterranean diet: does it have to cost more?

Author information

  • 1Nutritional Sciences Program and the Center for Obesity Research, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. adamdrew@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the viability of the Mediterranean diet as an affordable low-energy-density model for dietary change.

DESIGN:

Foods characteristic of the Mediterranean diet were identified using previously published criteria. For these foods, energy density (kJ/100 g) and nutrient density in relation to both energy ($/MJ) and nutrient cost were examined.

RESULTS:

Some nutrient-rich low-energy-density foods associated with the Mediterranean diet were expensive, however, others that also fit within the Mediterranean dietary pattern were not.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Mediterranean diet provides a socially acceptable framework for the inclusion of grains, pulses, legumes, nuts, vegetables and both fresh and dried fruit into a nutrient-rich everyday diet. The precise balance between good nutrition, affordability and acceptable social norms is an area that deserves further study. The new Mediterranean diet can be a valuable tool in helping to stem the global obesity epidemic.

PMID:
19689831
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2849996
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (8)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk