Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Matern Child Health J. 2010 Mar;14(2):261-7. doi: 10.1007/s10995-009-0498-6.

Prevalence of self-reported postpartum depression specific to season and latitude of birth: evaluating the PRAMS data.

Author information

  • 1Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA. jennifer.jewell9@gmail.com

Abstract

To determine whether season of infant birth or amount of daylight at time and location of birth is a risk factor for self-reported postpartum depression (PPD). The primary hypothesis was that the prevalence of PPD will peak during the darkest winter months. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) Phase 5 (2004-2006) data set (N = 67,079). Self-reported PPD was established using a modified version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2) included in the PRAMS questionnaire. Logistic regression for complex survey design was used to determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. No significant relationship was found between mild or moderate PPD and either season of birth or length of daylight at birth. By analyzing a large, multi-state sample, this study adds to the equivocal preexisting literature suggesting that there is no significant relationship between the season of birth or length of daylight at birth and PPD.

PMID:
19669394
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk