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Lipids Health Dis. 2009 Aug 10;8:33. doi: 10.1186/1476-511X-8-33.

Are all n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids created equal?

Author information

  • 1Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 Canada. banderso@uoguelph.ca

Abstract

N-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to have potential beneficial effects for chronic diseases including cancer, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in particular have been studied extensively, whereas substantive evidence for a biological role for the precursor, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), is lacking. It is not enough to assume that ALA exerts effects through conversion to EPA and DHA, as the process is highly inefficient in humans. Thus, clarification of ALA's involvement in health and disease is essential, as it is the principle n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumed in the North American diet and intakes of EPA and DHA are typically very low. There is evidence suggesting that ALA, EPA and DHA have specific and potentially independent effects on chronic disease. Therefore, this review will assess our current understanding of the differential effects of ALA, EPA and DHA on cancer, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease. Potential mechanisms of action will also be reviewed. Overall, a better understanding of the individual role for ALA, EPA and DHA is needed in order to make appropriate dietary recommendations regarding n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption.

PMID:
19664246
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3224740
Free PMC Article
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