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J Hosp Med. 2009 Nov;4(9):521-7. doi: 10.1002/jhm.508.

Afraid in the hospital: parental concern for errors during a child's hospitalization.

Author information

  • 1Division of General Pediatrics and Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit (CHEAR), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0456, USA. btarini@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

(1) To determine the proportion of parents concerned about medical errors during a child's hospitalization; and (2) the association between this concern and parental self-efficacy with physician interactions.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Tertiary care children's hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Parents of children admitted to the general medical service.

OUTCOME MEASURE:

Parental concern about medical errors.

METHODS:

: Parents were asked their agreement with the statement "When my child is in the hospital I feel that I have to watch over the care that he/she is receiving to make sure that mistakes aren't made." We used multivariate logistic regression to examine the association between parents' self-efficacy with physician interactions and the need "to watch over a child's care," adjusting for parent and child demographics, English proficiency, past hospitalization, and social desirability bias.

RESULTS:

Of 278 eligible parents, 130 completed surveys and 63% reported the need to watch over their child's care to ensure that mistakes were not made. Parents with greater self-efficacy with physician interactions were less likely to report this need (odds ratio [OR], 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.92). All parents who were "very uncomfortable" communicating with doctors in English reported the need to watch over their child's care to prevent mistakes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nearly two-thirds of surveyed parents felt the need to watch over their child's hospital care to prevent mistakes. Parents with greater self-efficacy with physician interactions were less likely to report the need to watch over their child's care while parents with lower English proficiency were more likely to report this need.

PMID:
19653281
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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