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Anal Biochem. 2009 Dec 1;395(1):91-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ab.2009.07.037. Epub 2009 Jul 29.

Simultaneous assay of isotopic enrichment and concentration of guanidinoacetate and creatine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

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  • 1Department of Pathobiology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, OH 44195, USA.

Abstract

A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the simultaneous measurement of isotopic enrichment and concentration of guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine in plasma sample for kinetic studies is reported. The method, based on preparation of the bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine methyl ester derivatives of GAA and creatine, is robust and sensitive. The lowest measurable m(1) and m(3) enrichment for GAA and creatine, respectively, was 0.3%. The calibration curves for measurements of concentration were linear over ranges of 0.5 to 250microM GAA and 2 to 500microM for creatine. The method was reliable for inter- and intraassay precision, accuracy, and linearity. The technique was applied in a healthy adult to determine the in vivo fractional synthesis rate of creatine using primed-constant rate infusion of [1-(13)C]glycine. It was found that isotopic enrichment of GAA reached a plateau by 30min of infusion of [1-(13)C]glycine, indicating either a small pool size or a rapid turnover rate (or both) of GAA. In contrast, the tracer appearance in creatine was slow (slope=0.00097), suggesting a large pool size and a slow rate of synthesis of creatine. This method can be used to estimate the rate of synthesis of creatine in vivo in human and animal studies.

PMID:
19646413
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3496933
Free PMC Article

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