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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Mar;18(3):489-98. doi: 10.1038/oby.2009.227. Epub 2009 Jul 30.

Expression and regulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase in adipose tissue.

Author information

  • 1Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. b-taeye@northwestern.edu

Abstract

Obesity is an increasingly important public health issue reaching epidemic proportions. Visceral obesity has been defined as an important element of the metabolic syndrome and expansion of the visceral fat mass has been shown to contribute to the development of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. To identify novel contributors to cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities in obesity, we analyzed the adipose proteome and identified soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in the epididymal fat pad from C57BL/6J mice that received either a regular diet or a "western diet." sEH was synthesized in adipocytes and expression levels increased upon differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although normalized sEH mRNA and protein levels did not differ in the fat pads from mice receiving a regular or a "western diet," total adipose sEH activity was higher in the obese mice, even after normalization for body weight. Furthermore, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists increased the expression of sEH in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes in vitro and in adipose tissue in vivo. Considering the established role for sEH in inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism, and the suggested involvement of sEH in the development of type 2 diabetes, our study has identified adipose sEH as a potential novel therapeutic target that might affect the development of metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities in obesity.

PMID:
19644452
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2864128
Free PMC Article

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