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Science. 2009 Jul 31;325(5940):607-10. doi: 10.1126/science.1172256.

The cAMP sensor Epac2 is a direct target of antidiabetic sulfonylurea drugs.

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  • 1Division of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan.

Abstract

Epac2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rap1, is activated by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and binding experiments revealed that sulfonylureas, widely used antidiabetic drugs, interact directly with Epac2. Sulfonylureas activated Rap1 specifically through Epac2. Sulfonylurea-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced both in vitro and in vivo in mice lacking Epac2, and the glucose-lowering effect of the sulfonylurea tolbutamide was decreased in these mice. Epac2 thus contributes to the effect of sulfonylureas to promote insulin secretion. Because Epac2 is also required for the action of incretins, gut hormones crucial for potentiating insulin secretion, it may be a promising target for antidiabetic drug development.

PMID:
19644119
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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