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J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2009 Jul-Aug;24(4):272-8. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0b013e3181a66342.

Depression treatment preferences after traumatic brain injury.

Author information

  • 1Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. fann@u.washington.edu <fann@u.washington.edu>

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine preferences for depression treatment modalities and settings among persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

DESIGN:

Telephone survey. Depression status was determined using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9.

SETTING:

Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, the level I trauma center serving Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Alaska.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred forty-five adults, English-speaking consecutive patients admitted with complicated mild to severe TBI.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Telephone survey within 12 months post-TBI ascertaining preferences for depression treatment modalities and settings.

RESULTS:

More patients favored physical exercise or counseling as a depression treatment than other treatment modalities. Group therapy was the least favored modality. Patients favored speaking with a clinician in the clinic or over the telephone and were less likely to communicate with a clinician over the Internet. Subjects with probable major depression or a history of antidepressant use or outpatient mental health treatment were more likely to express a preference for antidepressants for treatment of depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study underscores the importance of understanding patient preferences and providing patient education in selecting a treatment for depression after TBI. Future studies should examine psychotherapy and alternative treatment modalities and delivery models for the management of depression in this vulnerable population.

PMID:
19625866
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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