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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009 Sep;85(3):322-7. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2009.06.023. Epub 2009 Jul 21.

The relation between moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive function in older women with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

  • 1Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. mary.townsend@channing.harvard.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine the association between moderate drinking, cognitive function, and cognitive decline in women with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

From 1995 to 2001, we assessed cognitive function in 1,698 women aged 71-80 years with type 2 diabetes in the Nurses' Health Study. Assessments were repeated twice at 2-year intervals. We used linear regression to estimate multivariable-adjusted mean differences in initial cognitive function and longitudinal models to estimate cognitive decline over 4 years, according to average alcohol intake between diagnosis with diabetes and the initial cognitive measurement.

RESULTS:

At the initial assessment, the mean score on our test of general cognition was 0.31 (95% CI 0.02, 0.60) points higher in women who were moderate alcohol drinkers (those consuming 1.0-9.9 g of alcohol, or about 1 drink, per day) compared with abstainers. However, moderate alcohol was not associated with cognitive decline. Higher alcohol consumption (10.0-30.0 g of alcohol per day) was not associated with initial cognition or cognitive decline, although there was no apparent harm either.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among women with type 2 diabetes, moderate alcohol was associated with better initial cognition, but not reduced rates of cognitive decline. Thus, we found no clear and consistent cognitive benefits of moderate alcohol in diabetes.

PMID:
19625098
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2748648
Free PMC Article
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