Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Radiol. 2011 Jan;77(1):167-71. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.06.025. Epub 2009 Jul 19.

Radiofrequency ablation of large size liver tumours using novel plan-parallel expandable bipolar electrodes: initial clinical experience.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. mr.meijerink@vumc.nl

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Although radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a promising method for local treatment of liver malignancies, with conventional monopolar systems recurrence rates for large size tumours (≥3.5 cm) remain high. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and local effectiveness of a novel bipolar plan-parallel expandable system for these larger tumours.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:

Eight consecutive patients with either unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM in 6 patients), carcinoid liver metastases (1 patient) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in 1 patient) of ≥3.5 cm were treated with bipolar RFA during laparotomy with ultrasound guidance. Early and late, major and minor complications were recorded. Local success was determined on 3-8 month follow-up CT scans of the upper abdomen.

RESULTS:

Nine CRLM, one carcinoid liver metastases and one HCC (3.5-6.6 cm) were ablated with bipolar RFA. Average ablation time was 16 min (range 6-29 min.). Two patients developed a liver abscess which required re-laparotomy. In both cases bowel surgery during the same session probably caused bacterial spill. There were no mortalities. The patients were released from hospital between 5 and 29 days after the procedure (median 12 days). The 6-12 month follow-up PET-CT scans showed signs for marginal RFA-site tumour recurrence in three patients with CRLM (3/11 lesions).

CONCLUSION:

Preliminary results suggest bipolar RFA to be a reasonably safe, fast and feasible technique which seems to improve local control for large size hepatic tumour ablations.

Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19616911
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk