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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2009 Aug;67(8):1723-9. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2009.03.043.

Maxillary tuberosity block bone graft: innovative technique and case report.

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  • 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of the Pacific, San Francisco, CA 94105-5460, USA. info@SForalsurgeon.com

Abstract

Hard tissue defects resulting from trauma, infection, or tooth loss often lead to an unfavorable anatomy of maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes that become not suitable for implant therapy without bone grafting. The goal of pre-implant bone augmentation of the deficient alveolar ridge is reconstruction of the proper alveolar anatomy through the techniques of socket preservation, horizontal and vertical ridge augmentation, sinus bone grafting, and others. A variety of bone grafts and bone grafting materials have been used in the last 30 years for augmentation of deficient alveolar ridge for the purpose of implant treatment of partially and completely edentulous patients. Bone grafting options include autogenous, allogeneic, xenogeneic, synthetic bone, and combination of above. Autogenous bone grafts are considered "the gold standard" due to their compatibility and osteogenic potentials to form the new bone by processes of osteogenesis, osteoinduction, and osteoconduction. A particulate and block autogenous bone has been used for correction of alveolar ridge deficiency. Extraoral sites of autogenous block grafts include: ilium, calvarium, tibia, rib, and others. Intraoral sites of autogenous block grafts include symphysis and retromolar-ramus areas. In the clinical practice, a maxillary tuberosity bone graft has often been used as a particulate graft for augmentation of deficient alveolar ridge or maxillary sinus prior to or simultaneously with implant insertion. This article presents an innovative technique and reports a case of the maxillary tuberosity block bone graft that can be used to correct moderate to severe localized defects of the alveolar process prior to implant placement.

PMID:
19615588
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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