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PLoS One. 2009 Jul 15;4(7):e6261. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006261.

Top-down lipidomics reveals ether lipid deficiency in blood plasma of hypertensive patients.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine III, Carl Gustav Carus Medical School, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dyslipoproteinemia, obesity and insulin resistance are integrative constituents of the metabolic syndrome and are major risk factors for hypertension. The objective of this study was to determine whether hypertension specifically affects the plasma lipidome independently and differently from the effects induced by obesity and insulin resistance.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We screened the plasma lipidome of 19 men with hypertension and 51 normotensive male controls by top-down shotgun profiling on a LTQ Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer. The analysis encompassed 95 lipid species of 10 major lipid classes. Obesity resulted in generally higher lipid load in blood plasma, while the content of tri- and diacylglycerols increased dramatically. Insulin resistance, defined by HOMA-IR >3.5 and controlled for BMI, had little effect on the plasma lipidome. Importantly, we observed that in blood plasma of hypertensive individuals the overall content of ether lipids decreased. Ether phosphatidylcholines and ether phosphatidylethanolamines, that comprise arachidonic (20:4) and docosapentaenoic (22:5) fatty acid moieties, were specifically diminished. The content of free cholesterol also decreased, although conventional clinical lipid homeostasis indices remained unaffected.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Top-down shotgun lipidomics demonstrated that hypertension is accompanied by specific reduction of the content of ether lipids and free cholesterol that occurred independently of lipidomic alterations induced by obesity and insulin resistance. These results may form the basis for novel preventive and dietary strategies alleviating the severity of hypertension.

PMID:
19603071
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2705678
Free PMC Article
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