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J Biol Chem. 2009 Sep 18;284(38):25471-8. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M109.018895. Epub 2009 Jul 7.

The double-stranded RNA binding domain of the vaccinia virus E3L protein inhibits both RNA- and DNA-induced activation of interferon beta.

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  • 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine, University of Geneva School of Medicine, 9 Avenue de Champel, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

Vaccinia virus, a large DNA virus that replicates in the cytoplasm, expresses its E3L protein to inhibit the cellular innate immune response and apoptosis. E3L is a bifunctional protein that contains an N-terminal DNA binding domain (BD) and a C-terminal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-BD (residues 100-190), both of which contribute to viral pathogenesis by blocking the activation of cellular genes that respond to the viral infection. We report that expression of the dsRNA-BD alone inhibits not only the dsRNA-induced activation of interferon beta (IFNbeta) but also that of 5'-triphosphate single-stranded RNA and DNA-induced IFNbeta activation even though E3L(100-190) does not bind the latter two pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This inhibition occurs in both human HeLa and A549 cells, where RIG-I appears to be required for dsDNA-induced IFNbeta activation. Unexpectedly, the two residues most important for dsRNA binding are also critical for this domain's ability to inhibit all three nucleic acid-induced cellular responses.

PMID:
19584049
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2757948
Free PMC Article
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