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Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2009 Nov;467(11):2800-6. doi: 10.1007/s11999-009-0946-z. Epub 2009 Jun 30.

Compress periprosthetic fractures: interface stability and ease of revision.

Author information

  • 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Periprosthetic fractures after massive endoprosthetic reconstructions pose a reconstructive challenge and jeopardize limb preservation. Compressive osseointegration technology offers the promise of relative ease of prosthetic revision, since fixation is achieved by means of a short intramedullary device. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 221 patients who had Compress((R)) devices implanted in two centers between December, 1996 and December, 2008. The mean followup was 50 months (range, 1-123 months). Six patients (2.7%) sustained periprosthetic fractures and eight (3.6%) had nonperiprosthetic ipsilateral limb fractures occurring from 4 to 79 months postoperatively. All periprosthetic fractures occurred in patients with distal femoral implants (6/154, 3.9%). Surgery was performed in all six patients with periprosthetic femur fractures and for one with a nonperiprosthetic patellar fracture. The osseointegrated interface was radiographically stable in all 14 cases. All six patients with periprosthetic fracture underwent limb salvage procedures. Five patients had prosthetic revision; one patient who had internal fixation of the fracture ultimately underwent amputation for persistent infection. Periprosthetic fractures involving Compress((R)) fixation occur infrequently and most can be treated successfully with further surgery. When implant revision is needed, the bone preserved by virtue of using a shorter intramedullary Compress((R)) device as compared to conventional stems, allows for less complex surgery, making limb preservation more likely.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

PMID:
19565305
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2758988
Free PMC Article

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