Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jul;18(7):2022-9. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0238. Epub 2009 Jun 23.

Latinas and breast cancer outcomes: population-based sampling, ethnic identity, and acculturation assessment.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9175, USA. ahamilt@usc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Latinas and African-Americans with breast cancer, especially those of lower socioeconomic status and acculturation, have been underrepresented in studies assessing treatment satisfaction, decision-making, and quality of life. A study was designed to recruit a large and representative sample of these subgroups.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Incident cases were selected by rapid case ascertainment (RCA) in the Los Angeles Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry from 2005 to 2006, with oversampling of Latinas and African-Americans. Patients were mailed a questionnaire and $10 incentive 5 to 6 months after diagnosis; nonrespondents were contacted by telephone. Multivariate analysis was used to assess possible response bias. The RCA definition of Hispanic origin was validated by self-reports. The Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics index for Latina respondents was used.

RESULTS:

One thousand six hundred and ninety-eight eligible breast cancer cases were selected and 1,223 participated, for a response rate of 72.0%, which varied little by race/ethnicity. Age, race/ethnicity, and clinical factors were not associated with response; however, respondents were slightly more likely to be married and from higher socioeconomic status census tracts than nonrespondents. The RCA definition of Hispanic identity was highly sensitive (94.6%) and specific (90.0%). Lower acculturation was associated with lower education and literacy among Latinas.

DISCUSSION:

High response rates among all subgroups were achieved due to the use of RCA, an incentive, extensive telephone follow-up, a native Spanish-speaking interviewer, and a focused questionnaire. The low acculturation index category identified a highly vulnerable subgroup. This large sample representing subgroups with greater problems will provide a basis for developing better interventions to assist these women.

PMID:
19549806
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4147726
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk