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J Exp Med. 2009 Jul 6;206(7):1565-74. doi: 10.1084/jem.20082596. Epub 2009 Jun 22.

Cardiac 12/15 lipoxygenase-induced inflammation is involved in heart failure.

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  • 1Department of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670, Japan.


To identify a novel target for the treatment of heart failure, we examined gene expression in the failing heart. Among the genes analyzed, Alox15 encoding the protein 12/15 lipoxygenase (LOX) was markedly up-regulated in heart failure. To determine whether increased expression of 12/15-LOX causes heart failure, we established transgenic mice that overexpressed 12/15-LOX in cardiomyocytes. Echocardiography showed that Alox15 transgenic mice developed systolic dysfunction. Cardiac fibrosis increased in Alox15 transgenic mice with advancing age and was associated with the infiltration of macrophages. Consistent with these observations, cardiac expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) was up-regulated in Alox15 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. Treatment with 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, a major metabolite of 12/15-LOX, increased MCP-1 expression in cardiac fibroblasts and endothelial cells but not in cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of MCP-1 reduced the infiltration of macrophages into the myocardium and prevented both systolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis in Alox15 transgenic mice. Likewise, disruption of 12/15-LOX significantly reduced cardiac MCP-1 expression and macrophage infiltration, thereby improving systolic dysfunction induced by chronic pressure overload. Our results suggest that cardiac 12/15-LOX is involved in the development of heart failure and that inhibition of 12/15-LOX could be a novel treatment for this condition.

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