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Biol Psychiatry. 2009 Oct 1;66(7):695-701. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.05.009. Epub 2009 Jul 9.

Physiological responses to brain stimulation during limbic surgery: further evidence of anterior cingulate modulation of autonomic arousal.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. afgentil@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In view of conflicting neuroimaging results regarding autonomic-specific activity within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), we investigated autonomic responses to direct brain stimulation during stereotactic limbic surgery.

METHODS:

Skin conductance activity and accelerative heart rate responses to multi-voltage stimulation of the ACC (n = 7) and paralimbic subcaudate (n = 5) regions were recorded during bilateral anterior cingulotomy and bilateral subcaudate tractotomy (in patients that had previously received an adequate lesion in the ACC), respectively.

RESULTS:

Stimulations in both groups were accompanied by increased autonomic arousal. Skin conductance activity was significantly increased during ACC stimulations compared with paralimbic targets at 2 V (2.34 +/- .68 [score in microSiemens +/- SE] vs. .34 +/- .09, p = .013) and 3 V (3.52 +/- .86 vs. 1.12 +/- .37, p = .036), exhibiting a strong "voltage-response" relationship between stimulus magnitude and response amplitude (difference from 1 to 3 V = 1.15 +/- .90 vs. 3.52 +/- .86, p = .041). Heart rate response was less indicative of between-group differences.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study of its kind aiming at seeking novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for central autonomic modulation. It supports a concept that interregional interactions account for the coordination of autonomic arousal.

PMID:
19545859
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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