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Atherosclerosis. 2009 Dec;207(2):585-90. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.05.030. Epub 2009 Jun 6.

Serum vitamin D, parathyroid hormone levels, and carotid atherosclerosis.

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  • 1Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. reisjp@nhlbi.nih.gov

Abstract

Evidence suggests low vitamin D and elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations may increase risk for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the association between vitamin D or PTH and subclinical atherosclerosis. This cross-sectional study included 654 community-dwelling older adults aged 55-96 years (mean age, 75.5 years) without a history of coronary heart disease, revascularization, or stroke enrolled in the Rancho Bernardo Study who completed a clinic examination in 1997-1999 and provided a blood sample for determination of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D], and PTH concentrations. Carotid artery intima-media wall thickness (IMT) was measured as an indicator of atherosclerosis at two sites with B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, waist-to-hip ratio, exercise, season of blood draw, diabetes, and hypertension, geometric mean internal carotid IMT (p(trend) 0.022), but not common carotid IMT (p(trend) 0.834) decreased in a dose-dependent fashion with increasing concentration of 25(OH)D. There was no association of 1,25(OH)(2)D or PTH with either measure of carotid IMT. In subgroup analyses, 1,25(OH)(2)D was inversely associated with internal carotid IMT among those with hypertension (p for interaction 0.036). These findings from a population-based cohort of older adults suggest a potential role for vitamin D in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. Additional research is needed to determine whether vitamin D may influence the progression of atherosclerosis, including the effects of supplementation on the atherosclerotic process.

PMID:
19539290
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2788082
Free PMC Article
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