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Int J Pharm. 2009 Sep 8;379(1):174-80. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2009.06.004. Epub 2009 Jun 11.

Nanoparticles engineered from lecithin-in-water emulsions as a potential delivery system for docetaxel.

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  • 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, United States.

Abstract

Docetaxel is a potent anticancer drug. However, there continues to be a need for alternative docetaxel delivery systems to improve its efficacy. We reported the engineering of a novel spherical nanoparticle formulation ( approximately 270 nm) from lecithin-in-water emulsions. Docetaxel can be incorporated into the nanoparticles, and the resultant docetaxel-nanoparticles were stable when stored as an aqueous suspension. The release of the docetaxel from the nanoparticles was likely caused by a combination of diffusion and Case II transport. The docetaxel-in-nanoparticles were more effective in killing tumor cells in culture than free docetaxel. Moreover, the docetaxel-nanoparticles did not cause any significant red blood cell lysis or platelet aggregation in vitro, nor did they induce detectable acute liver damage when injected intravenously into mice. Finally, compared to free docetaxel, the intravenously injected docetaxel-nanoparticles increased the accumulation of the docetaxel in a model tumor in mice by 4.5-fold. These lecithin-based nanoparticles have the potential to be a novel biocompatible and efficacious delivery system for docetaxel.

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