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Clin Biochem. 2009 Sep;42(13-14):1375-80. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2009.06.003. Epub 2009 Jun 10.

The circulating concentration and ratio of total and high molecular weight adiponectin in post-menopausal women with and without osteoporosis and its association with body mass index and biochemical markers of bone metabolism.

Author information

  • 1The Unit of Clinical Chemistry, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK. ravsodi@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

There is increasing evidence suggesting that adiponectin plays a role in the regulation of bone metabolism.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

This was a cross-sectional study of 34 post-menopausal women with and 37 without osteoporosis. All subjects had body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), total-, high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin and their ratio, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a marker of bone resorption (betaCTX) and formation (P1NP) measured.

RESULTS:

We observed a positive correlation between BMI and BMD (r=0.44, p<0.001). When normalised for BMI, total-, HMW-adiponectin concentrations and HMW/total-adiponectin ratio were significantly lower in obese compared to lean subjects but there was no difference between those with or without osteoporosis. There were significant negative correlations between HMW/total-adiponectin ratio and BMI (r=-0.27, p=0.030) and with OPG (r=-0.44, p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggests that there is no significant difference in the circulating concentration of fasting early morning total- or HMW-adiponectin in post-menopausal women with or without osteoporosis. The correlation between HMW/total-adiponectin ratio and OPG may indicate that adiponectin could influence bone metabolism by altering osteoblast production of OPG thereby affecting osteoclasts mediated bone resorption.

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PMID:
19523465
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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