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Opt Express. 2006 Jun 26;14(13):6213-25.

Chromatic aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging in the near infrared.

Abstract

An achromatizing lens has been designed for the human eye in the near infrared range, from 700 to 900 nm, for retinal imaging purposes. Analysis of the performance of the lens, including tolerance to misalignments, has been mathematically accomplished by using an existing eye model. The calculations have shown a virtually perfect correction of the ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration, while still keeping a high optical quality. Ocular aberrations in five subjects have been measured with and without the achromatizing lens by using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a broad bandwidth femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in the spectral range of interest with a set of interference filters, studying the benefits and limits in the use of the achromatizing lens. Ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration has been experimentally demonstrated to be fully corrected by the proposed lens, with no induction of any other parasitic aberration. The practical implementation of the achromatizing lens for Ophthalmoscopy, specifically for optical coherence tomography where the use of polychromatic light sources in the near infrared portion of the spectrum is mandatory, has been considered. The potential benefits of using this lens in combination with adaptive optics to achieve a full aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging have also been discussed.

PMID:
19516794
[PubMed]
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