Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2009 Apr;47(4):327-35. doi: 10.1080/15563650902870277.

AAPCC database characterization of native U.S. venomous snake exposures, 2001-2005.

Author information

  • 1New Mexico Poison and Drug Information Center, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. sseifert@salud.unm.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Differences in victim demographics, clinical effects, managements, and outcomes among native viperid (rattlesnake, copperhead, and cottonmouth) and elapid (coral snake) species have not been systematically characterized.

METHODS:

The database of the American Association of Poison Control Centers from 2001 through 2005 was analyzed.

RESULTS:

Between 2001 and 2005, there were 23,676 human exposures (average = 4,735/year) to native venomous snakes in the United States reported to U.S. poison centers in all states except Hawaii: 98% were to viperid snakes and 2% to elapids. Overall, 77% of victims were male, 70% were adults >20 years, and 12% were aged less than 10 years. Sixty-five cases involved pregnant women, with rattlesnake bites resulting in moderate or greater effects in over 70%. The overall hospital admission rate was 53%. Outcomes were generally more severe with rattlesnake and copperhead envenomations and in children <6 years of age. The fatality rate of reported cases was 0.06%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Native U.S. venomous snakebite results in considerable morbidity and mortality. Rattlesnake and copperhead envenomations, and those in children <6 years of age, produce the most severe outcomes, but coral snakebites result in similar hospital admission rates.

PMID:
19514880
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Informa Healthcare
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk